This seating story made our day

Letter post with stacks of incoming and outgoing mail

Recently we received a letter that made our day — what a story.
We love happy endings!

In 1975 I was injured in a farming accident and ended up a T10 paraplegic. For the first seven years, I used a naugahyde-covered foam cushion. I was able to sit up three to five hours before having pressure sore issues. I then switched to a Roho air cushion and was able to extend my sitting time to five to six hours before having issues.

As I aged, my sitting time slowly decreased. I found a $5000 electric pulsating air cushion and thought my problems were over. I worked directly with the company, but, unfortunately, had terrible results no matter what we did.

Over these 30 years, I spent half to three quarters of my waking time in bed either trying to prevent a pressure sore or recovering from one.

I then learned Mayo Clinic was starting a seating clinic for anyone in a wheelchair. I decided to make an appointment to see what they had to offer.

At the appointment, they put me on a pressure mapping pad and told me they had the perfect solution. I had been through several pressure mapping sessions at other places, so I was skeptical of their comment.

They brought out a Ride Java Cushion and for the next half hour, I got on and off the cushion while they shaped it to the reading on the pressure map. They were soon satisfied and said stay in town to try it for a few days. I was naturally very skeptical — I was going back to a simple, economical foam cushion like I had used 40 years before. I stayed in town and tried it for several different time periods.

No matter what length of time I spent sitting, I never had any red areas. I went back so they could re-look at the pressure map.  They said nothing had changed and I was good to go. I went back home and was soon sitting up 8 to 10 hours per day with absolutely no red spots or any areas showing any kind of pressure problem.

I have used the cushion over five years now with not one single issue.  I can easily sit up 18 hours at a time with no problem. After being in a wheelchair for 45 of my 66 years, it is a miracle.

Ride has always responded promptly to any of the many questions I have asked. I recently bought a second cushion to have as a spare even though I have not noticed much wear on my first.

I can’t say enough good about the Java Cushion and the team at Ride. They have given me my life back.

Sincerely,
Gary K.

Kudos to Gary for his persistence. We’re so glad he discovered Ride’s Java Cushion to be a great fit for his sit-uation. Thank you for writing!

Read more user success stories here and learn more about the Ride Java Cushion here.

Consider replacement parts…

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Ride Java Cushion component parts and possible accessories, without cover.

Medicare and other funding sources that follow Medicare guidelines have long considered the “reasonable, useful lifetime” (RUL) of durable medical equipment to be five years. This means that these funding agencies will not pay for a piece of equipment to be replaced within five years of its purchase, unless a change in medical condition warrants the purchase of a new type of equipment.

Historically, this rule was not applied to wheelchair cushions and back supports. However, this changed recently when suppliers began seeing denials for replacement cushions and backs, if the existing equipment was purchased within the last five years.

The wheelchair seating industry does not believe that the five year “RUL” policy should be applied to wheelchair seating. We are working hard to advocate for this policy to be changed.

In the meantime, there are ways to “repair” Ride Designs’ cushions and back supports, and to have those repairs covered by insurance.

Components of existing Ride wheelchair cushions and backs can be ordered individually for replacement, and often this will resolve any issues that are causing the cushion or back to need replacement. For example, if a Ride Java® Cushion has compressed foam and is no longer providing proper positioning or skin protection, the foam topper can be replaced individually, without having to replace the entire cushion. This (and any other cushion or back components except covers) can be billed with code K0108. Labor to replace the component (E1340) can be billed to most payers as well, including Medicare. Replacement covers are billed using code E2619.

Please refer to the Ride Parts Manual to locate part numbers for individual cushion and back components, or contact our Customer Service Department at 303.781.1633 or customerservice@ridedesigns.com for more information.

2020 Custom Certification Courses announced

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The course is designed specifically for clinicians and suppliers who want to take their seating skills to the next level. Learn why coming to Colorado for the course could be a game-changer for your seating practice, here.

Plan now to take a Ride Custom Certification Course in 2020!

January 9 – 10
February 27 – 28
April 23 – 24
July 30 – 31
October 22 – 23
October 29 – 30

Registration is open; class size is limited. We look forward to hosting you for a great educational experience at Ride Designs in Colorado.

Just the Facts: Complex Rehab Technology (CRT)

For your reference in advocating for protecting access to equipment for all CRT users, this guide was developed by NRRTS and their CRT user coalition, Unite4CRT. Be sure to contact your member of Congress to ensure that they understand how important CRT is to the independence and health of wheelchair users. Tell your story to bring it home.

Fact Sheet Infographics