Exciting research from Italy

We’re not surprised that the Java Cushion continues to surpass expectations… Now research from a prospective observational study, done in Italy, helps demonstrate the Java Cushion’s ability to promote healing of stage I-II-III pressure injuries.

In a study of 15 subjects with SCI, all existing injuries closed and no new injuries occurred.

  • The Java Cushion was beneficial in the treatment of ischial pressure injuries.
  • “Maybe the (Java) cushion is therefore a valid alternative to the traditional communicating air-cell cushion.”

Read the abstract in the Italian Journal of Prevention, Diagnostic and Therapeutic Medicine (available in both english and italian).

Ride Java Cushion

Learn how to evaluate industry-sponsored research

A new online CEU course!

Searching for Good Outcomes in Industry Sponsored Research is Ride University’s latest free CEU course offering. 

Taught by Sharon Sonenblum, PhD, Biomechanical Researcher at Georgia Tech University, the course provides information on the different types of studies being done, how to evaluate the research processes, and how you might use the results in clinical decision-making.

Learn more about wheelchair seating and Ride products, from experts in the field, and at your own convenience, on Ride University’s online education platform.

New clinical research from Germany

The Forward and Java Cushions were the subject of recent clinical trials, to evaluate their efficacy, in support of Ride’s entry into the German market.

View the research summaries here for the Forward Cushion, the Java Cushion, or download the complete clinical test results.

Peruse additional relevant research on Ride products on the website here.

New study on seated buttocks anatomy

sonenblum_study_mri

A new study describes the amount, types, and shapes of tissue present in the buttocks during sitting (i.e., seated buttocks soft tissue anatomy) and the impact of seated buttocks soft tissue anatomy on biomechanical risk. Authored by Sharon Sonenblum, Ph.D., the study is available in the Journal of Tissue Viability here.

Highlights include:

  • Bulk tissue thickness under the seated ischium varied from 5.6 to 32.1 mm.
  • Wheelchair users with a pressure ulcer history have more peaked buttocks contours.
  • Most people do not have gluteus maximus covering their ischial tuberosity.

The ultimate goal of Dr. Sonenblum’s work is to define biomechanical risk of skin breakdown so watch for further study results with data related to risk on various seating surfaces, including the Java Cushion. Ride Designs has supplemented a federal grant awarded to Georgia Tech University to help support this ongoing, important research.

Read more research related to Ride Designs wheelchair seating products here.